Depression Risk in PCOS Patients

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE’S 2017 SCIENTIFIC CONGRESS & EXPO

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San Antonio, TX-Two studies presented at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Society Scientific Congress today delved into the relationship between Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and depression.

Both papers came out of a large clinical trial, the Pregnancy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome II trial, a project of the NIH’s Reproductive Medicine Network. The trial enrolled more than 700 women with PCOS at sites around the country.

Subjects were given a specially designed, validated Quality of Life survey for PCOS patients. The survey measures quality of life areas important for PCOS patients: Emotional, Body Hair, Infertility, Weight and Menstrual problems. In total 9% of the patients met the criteria for clinical depression. The PCOS patients with depression reported significantly lower scores on all five domains. Even when controlling for objective measures such as weight and degree of hirsutism, the relationship between self-reported quality of life and depression held.

A related study from the same trial sought to identify the predictors of depression in women with PCOS. The investigators examined demographic, metabolic and hormone factors.  They found depressed patients were younger, had higher BMI’s and were more likely to fall into lower income brackets than non-depressed patients.  They also found that insulin resistance was associated with depressed mood.

“PCOS is a challenging condition for patients. The described relationship between PCOS and depression in these studies is important, though unfortunately not surprising. Fortunately, the rigor of this trial allows one to begin to look at specifics, like insulin resistance, that might lead to better treatment outcomes,” said Thomas Price M.D., President of SREI.

O-171 E. Greenwood et al,” INSULIN RESISTANCE AND ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE IMPACT DEPRESSION RISK IN PCOS.”

 

ASRM is a multidisciplinary organization dedicated to the advancement of the science and practice of reproductive medicine. The Society accomplishes its mission through the pursuit of excellence in education and research and through advocacy on behalf of patients, physicians, and affiliated health care providers. The Society is committed to facilitating and sponsoring educational activities for the lay public and continuing medical education activities for professionals who are engaged in the practice of and research in reproductive medicine. www.asrm.org 


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